The Illiberalism of Japan’s Detention Policies: an Interview with Professor Takamura

By Joy Kwak Detention Centers In an increasingly globalized world with rising protectionist and nationalist attitudes, many countries are confronting migrant workers, immigrants and refugees with restrictive and illiberal policies in order to limit immigration. These measures, however, are also combined with detentainment policies. A highly contested topic, detention is meant to be “an administrative measure to ensure that migrants cannot abscond while preparation for … Continue reading The Illiberalism of Japan’s Detention Policies: an Interview with Professor Takamura

The Venezuelan Refugee Crisis: Consequences and Responses

By Laurence Campanella In 2013, when Nicolàs Maduro rose to power and assumed Venezuela’s presidential office following the passing of socialist mentor and predecessor, Hugo Chavez, he inherited an already tenuous economy that would soon go into freefall. While many Venezuelans attribute the economic crisis to systemic corruption and mismanagement, others, such as Maduro himself, blame the demise on sanctions imposed by the United States.  … Continue reading The Venezuelan Refugee Crisis: Consequences and Responses

The Demise of Path Dependency: Pakistan’s Economy

By Laurence Campanella As inflation continues to soar and global market tumult intensifies, Pakistan’s economy continues to face “serious challenges on [both] the fiscal and external fronts.” In the past three months, Pakistan has experienced rising non-performing bank loans, plummeting exports, as well as soaring inflation and plunging stocks as recently as February of this year. Despite the growing signs of economic turmoil, Prime Minister … Continue reading The Demise of Path Dependency: Pakistan’s Economy

Climate Refugees: Are We Using The Right Terminology?

By Sofia Mikton In recent years, the term ‘climate refugee’ has become the term of choice for describing those at risk of climate-induced displacement. The term has become widespread in popular discourse and news media circles, finding itself at the intersection of environmental and humanitarian concern. Despite the term’s appeal, academics, refugee organizations, and future ‘climate refugees’ themselves, have all cautioned against its use. Not … Continue reading Climate Refugees: Are We Using The Right Terminology?

Contemplating Contemporary Colonialism: Making sense of China’s Increasing Investment and Influence in Africa

By Laurence Campanella China’s growing financial investment in the African continent has brought with it concerns, with many questioning whether its foreign direct investment (FDI) and trade policies are a form of neo-colonialism. In order to responsibly address these important questions, it is crucial to acknowledge the vestiges of European imperialism that continue to influence African socio-economic dynamics, whilst recognizing the progressively globalizing nature of … Continue reading Contemplating Contemporary Colonialism: Making sense of China’s Increasing Investment and Influence in Africa

Renewable Energy Investment: How Southeast Asia is Mitigating Climate Change

By Bérénice Collignon Renewable Energy Investment in Southeast Asia  Climate change has become the number one priority in this new decade. Research and investment in renewable energy is commonly seen as a viable path to combatting this issue. The release of greenhouse gases, polluting emissions, as well as the environmental destruction associated with the extraction of non-renewable energies, are all consequences of the unsustainable practices … Continue reading Renewable Energy Investment: How Southeast Asia is Mitigating Climate Change

A Pipe Dream? – Pipelines and Indigenous Sovereignty in Canada

By Joy Kwak Trans Mountain and Coastal GasLink Canada’s Trans Mountain Expansion Project (commonly known as the Trans Mountain Pipeline or TMX) has been at the crux of numerous debates since its conception. This particular project, which was approved by the federal government in 2019, will be an extension of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline aiming to carry crude and refined oil from oil sands … Continue reading A Pipe Dream? – Pipelines and Indigenous Sovereignty in Canada

Was China’s Communist Revolution a Women’s Revolution?

By Bérénice Collignon On November 9th, the McGill University chapter of Global China Connection, held a discussion panel titled “What is behind China’s 70th anniversary?”. As a McGill student association, it aims to promote cultural and business exchanges between students through various types of events. At this panel, Dr. Gal Gvili, a professor of East Asian Studies at McGill University, discussed the changes brought by … Continue reading Was China’s Communist Revolution a Women’s Revolution?

Coronavirus Outbreak: Discussing the Effectiveness of the Chinese Government’s Response

By Enkhuun Byambadorj Fear and panic engulfed China’s usually vibrant and thunderous New Year festivities, as the country was faced with the outbreak of a novel coronavirus originating in Wuhan, China, the capital of Hubei province. December 8th, 2019 witnessed the first death of a patient with unknown etiology among 41 others who had been admitted to Wuhan hospitals with similar conditions. Since then, the … Continue reading Coronavirus Outbreak: Discussing the Effectiveness of the Chinese Government’s Response

Bleaching of the Coral Triangle – What Does this Mean for the Philippines?

By Bérénice Collignon Located in the western Pacific Ocean is a 6 million square kilometer coral area referred to as the Coral Triangle. This economic cornerstone is currently under threat, with grave implications for both the global community and the six countries it borders: the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Timor Leste. Corals have a symbiotic relationship with zooxanthellae algae; … Continue reading Bleaching of the Coral Triangle – What Does this Mean for the Philippines?