The Indian Supreme Court’s Verdict on Religiously Disputed Land and Its Implications

By Mehak Balwani India’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of Hindus on November 9th, 2019 in a decades-old dispute over a holy site contested by Muslims. This holy site is in Ayodhya, a city in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, and is the birthplace of one of the most revered Hindu gods, Lord Ram. At the centre of this dispute is a 16th-century mosque … Continue reading The Indian Supreme Court’s Verdict on Religiously Disputed Land and Its Implications

Giving Rivers Rights: A Novel Approach to Protecting the Environment

By Maeve Williams In the current wave of environmentalism, it is difficult to distinguish between radical and moderate movement in the direction of environmental protection. Climate marches, once a radical rebellion, have become an  almost mundane occurrence as their frequency grows globally. This reveals a deep rooted issue of grassroot protests: they can become so widespread that they disappear into the daily political discourse. Thus, … Continue reading Giving Rivers Rights: A Novel Approach to Protecting the Environment

The McGill Food Coalition Kick-Off Event – Community and Food Go Hand-in-Hand

By Enkhuun Byambadorj Food and community were the dominant themes at the McGill Food Coalition’s (MFC) kick-off event on November 15th. Attendees were welcomed with warm coffee, MFC pins, and an honest discussion about the state of McGill University’s food system.  The main event of the kick-off was a panel discussion, featuring four prominent members of McGill’s and Montreal’s food communities: Graham Calder – founder … Continue reading The McGill Food Coalition Kick-Off Event – Community and Food Go Hand-in-Hand

What Anti-Gay Sentiment Means for the LGBTQ+ Community in Uganda

By Mehak Balwani Uganda is one of at least seventy-two countries where homosexuality is criminalized. On October 10th, lawmakers stated that they would be reintroducing a bill to carry out tougher punishments against homosexual acts, recalling the 2013 “Kill The Gays” bill that proposed the death penalty for certain cases. Uganda is moving backwards on the issue of gay rights, though not to a time … Continue reading What Anti-Gay Sentiment Means for the LGBTQ+ Community in Uganda

Comparative Case Study: Abortion Access in Morocco vs. Missouri

By Maeve Williams When examining the restricted access to reproductive rights in Rabat, Morocco and St. Louis, Missouri, there is a common link: colonialism.  In the era of first world feminism, it seems that double standards feed deeper divisions more often than they cause compassion. The severity of a female’s struggle is too often compared to another female’s, rather than her male counterpart. For example, … Continue reading Comparative Case Study: Abortion Access in Morocco vs. Missouri

The Unity of Lebanon’s October Revolution: Art, Protest, and Social Media

By Adriana Franco International media has been flooded with images of protests in Lebanon that are millions strong, from Lebanon’s southernmost cities of Nabatieyeh and Tyre, to the northernmost city of Tripoli and to the nation’s capital Beirut . This anti-regime movement is largely transnational as well, as solidarity protests have been organized by the Lebanese diaspora across Canada, Europe, and the United States. The … Continue reading The Unity of Lebanon’s October Revolution: Art, Protest, and Social Media

The United States’ Use of Human Rights as a Bargaining Chip in its Trade War with China: Why Here? Why Now?

By Laurence Campanella As the trade war rages on between China and the United States, President Donald Trump’s recent strategy of calling out the human rights abuses of President Xi Jinping’s administration comes as an interesting development. The trade war can be traced back to July 2018, when China decided to stop buying U.S. soybeans in response to the United States’ increased tariffs on Chinese … Continue reading The United States’ Use of Human Rights as a Bargaining Chip in its Trade War with China: Why Here? Why Now?