Reparative Conversations: Transitional Justice in Albania, an Interview with Kristale Ivezaj Rama

Rama believes this project is a “tiny seed” in the greater movement towards transitional justice, something those living in Albania need to be able to move forward. Limitations on free speech and an unstable economy are just some of the lasting effects of this period in Albania, and as Rama so eloquently put, the “people can’t think about the past if they are too preoccupied with the present and worry about their future”.

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Buying a Blind Eye: The Abuse of Liberty in Saudi Arabia

The Saudi agenda is based purely on the goals and aspirations of the royal family. It violates and marginalizes many groups such as Shia Muslims and women through the use of strong central authority and strict enforcement of arbitrary laws and regulations. The government condones and conducts the unfair treatment of activists and those who aim to change the discriminatory status quo in the powerful, oil-rich state.

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Alessandra Munduruku: A Symbol Hope for the Indigenous Peoples of Brazil

Above everything, the 2020 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights prize has revealed the importance of Alessandra Korap Munduruku and other Indigenous peoples’ claims and has officially marked her place as a relevant figure for human rights activism. The award may be perceived as just another step closer to the recognition of Brazilian indigenous’ rights.

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Human Rights Activism Week — Opening Statement

The need for action on Human Rights is at an all-time high—and our set of pieces selected for this week aspire to demonstrate the various ways that organizations and individuals have worked to push back against growing inequities present across the world. In the end, we hope that these articles will fuel a sense of empowerment, ultimately showing that bottoms-up activism remains alive and well, despite trying times.

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Challenging the International Response to the Refugee Crisis

Thus far, the global response of most developed countries has been to funnel money into the international refugee support system, which provides humanitarian aid relief through the establishment of refugee camps. As these camps are short-term solutions, in most host countries, refugees lack the right to work or move freely. This might not have been a problem if the duration of their stay were short, however the conflicts from which refugees flee usually last indefinitely.

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