Liberté, égalité, fraternité?

Reports of terrorist acts often plant biased rhetoric and paint the Muslim population as a whole in a violent and ruthless light. There is no undermining the severity of these attacks, however it is not uncommon for them to serve as a contribution to the common narrative depicting the Islamic religion as one with savage inclinations. Rather than painting the attacks as isolated anomalies, media outlets often use them to feed into an ever present mentality of bigotry, something that the Muslim community has had to work in one way or another, to prove themselves separate from.

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Dissociation, Dispossession, and Food in the Israel-Palestine conflict

Food is an often overlooked element in conversations of national identity. Food is tangible, it is known by most members of a nation regardless of socio-economic background, and it is “experienced everyday”. Food is incredibly important for both parties in this two-sided conflict, as it plays a strong role in the creation of identity for each group.

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Challenging the International Response to the Refugee Crisis

Thus far, the global response of most developed countries has been to funnel money into the international refugee support system, which provides humanitarian aid relief through the establishment of refugee camps. As these camps are short-term solutions, in most host countries, refugees lack the right to work or move freely. This might not have been a problem if the duration of their stay were short, however the conflicts from which refugees flee usually last indefinitely.

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Confronting Mask Culture in China and Canada

When it comes to a collective crisis like this, behaviour tends to be related to notions of collectivism and individualism. One may say that the Canadian protests display greater support for individualism over collectivism. However, in reality, the difference stems from how people from different parts of the world view the idea of collectivism. For Chinese, fulfilling social obligation arises out of moral responsibility.

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The Illiberalism of Japan’s Detention Policies: an Interview with Professor Takamura

In this interview, I take you to Japan: an economic powerhouse, stable democracy, and a country known for its increasing reliance on migrant workers. Meanwhile, the Japanese government’s immigration laws and detainment practices also oppress and deprive the rights of many migrant workers, immigrants, illegal migrants and refugees – topics which are not commonly discussed in Japanese society for fear of governmental retaliation.

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