Reparative Conversations: Transitional Justice in Albania, an Interview with Kristale Ivezaj Rama

Rama believes this project is a “tiny seed” in the greater movement towards transitional justice, something those living in Albania need to be able to move forward. Limitations on free speech and an unstable economy are just some of the lasting effects of this period in Albania, and as Rama so eloquently put, the “people can’t think about the past if they are too preoccupied with the present and worry about their future”.

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Challenging the International Response to the Refugee Crisis

Thus far, the global response of most developed countries has been to funnel money into the international refugee support system, which provides humanitarian aid relief through the establishment of refugee camps. As these camps are short-term solutions, in most host countries, refugees lack the right to work or move freely. This might not have been a problem if the duration of their stay were short, however the conflicts from which refugees flee usually last indefinitely.

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The Indian Migrant Labour Crisis and Its Implications

Often, governments are expected to provide help to the vulnerable during a pandemic. Yet instead of giving workers the job security and resources they needed, governments of several predominantly agricultural states, including Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, and Gujarat, commenced changes to labour laws. These have largely benefitted industries, leaving informal labour more vulnerable than ever.

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The Illiberalism of Japan’s Detention Policies: an Interview with Professor Takamura

In this interview, I take you to Japan: an economic powerhouse, stable democracy, and a country known for its increasing reliance on migrant workers. Meanwhile, the Japanese government’s immigration laws and detainment practices also oppress and deprive the rights of many migrant workers, immigrants, illegal migrants and refugees – topics which are not commonly discussed in Japanese society for fear of governmental retaliation.

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