Climate Refugees: Are We Using The Right Terminology?

By Sofia Mikton In recent years, the term ‘climate refugee’ has become the term of choice for describing those at risk of climate-induced displacement. The term has become widespread in popular discourse and news media circles, finding itself at the intersection of environmental and humanitarian concern. Despite the term’s appeal, academics, refugee organizations, and future ‘climate refugees’ themselves, have all cautioned against its use. Not … Continue reading Climate Refugees: Are We Using The Right Terminology?

Renewable Energy Investment: How Southeast Asia is Mitigating Climate Change

By Bérénice Collignon Renewable Energy Investment in Southeast Asia  Climate change has become the number one priority in this new decade. Research and investment in renewable energy is commonly seen as a viable path to combatting this issue. The release of greenhouse gases, polluting emissions, as well as the environmental destruction associated with the extraction of non-renewable energies, are all consequences of the unsustainable practices … Continue reading Renewable Energy Investment: How Southeast Asia is Mitigating Climate Change

Bleaching of the Coral Triangle – What Does this Mean for the Philippines?

By Bérénice Collignon Located in the western Pacific Ocean is a 6 million square kilometer coral area referred to as the Coral Triangle. This economic cornerstone is currently under threat, with grave implications for both the global community and the six countries it borders: the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Timor Leste. Corals have a symbiotic relationship with zooxanthellae algae; … Continue reading Bleaching of the Coral Triangle – What Does this Mean for the Philippines?

Giving Rivers Rights: A Novel Approach to Protecting the Environment

By Maeve Williams In the current wave of environmentalism, it is difficult to distinguish between radical and moderate movement in the direction of environmental protection. Climate marches, once a radical rebellion, have become an  almost mundane occurrence as their frequency grows globally. This reveals a deep rooted issue of grassroot protests: they can become so widespread that they disappear into the daily political discourse. Thus, … Continue reading Giving Rivers Rights: A Novel Approach to Protecting the Environment

The McGill Food Coalition Kick-Off Event – Community and Food Go Hand-in-Hand

By Enkhuun Byambadorj Food and community were the dominant themes at McGill Food Coalition’s (MFC) kick-off event on November 15th. Attendees were welcomed with warm coffee, MFC pins, and an honest discussion about the state of McGill University’s food system.  The main event of the kick-off was a panel discussion, featuring four prominent members of McGill’s and Montreal’s food communities: Graham Calder – founder of … Continue reading The McGill Food Coalition Kick-Off Event – Community and Food Go Hand-in-Hand

Mongolia’s Raw Coal Ban Promises Results… But What Kind of Results?

By Enkhuun Byambadorj This is a story of development – the aid-dependent economy, deep public mistrust in the government, rapid urban migration, and a silent plague that blankets the sky in the cold winter months. For the 1.5 million people living in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar, the -40°C winters bring with them air pollution levels comparable to, and sometimes surpassing, much larger cities such as … Continue reading Mongolia’s Raw Coal Ban Promises Results… But What Kind of Results?

Interview with Weeam Ben Rejeb

By The Catalyst Editorial Board. Last week, our team met with Weeam Ben Rejeb to talk about her upcoming article “Disasters as Opportunities: The Disaster Capitalism Pitfall” in the new edition of Chrysalis. Her article explores the ways in which disaster relief has become characterized by capitalist ventures. If you are interested in her article, you can watch her thesis video, where she explains it … Continue reading Interview with Weeam Ben Rejeb