The Power of Art in the Face of Revolution

By Mehak Balwani Almost four months after the start of the anti-government protests in Baghdad, what is left is not only an amalgamation of rebellion and government retaliation but also an assortment of art, including paintings, poems, plays and literature.  The demonstrations started on October 1st, 2019 and are ongoing. They were born from the people’s resentment and their anger at the endemic corruption, external … Continue reading The Power of Art in the Face of Revolution

Climate Refugees: Are We Using The Right Terminology?

By Sofia Mikton In recent years, the term ‘climate refugee’ has become the term of choice for describing those at risk of climate-induced displacement. The term has become widespread in popular discourse and news media circles, finding itself at the intersection of environmental and humanitarian concern. Despite the term’s appeal, academics, refugee organizations, and future ‘climate refugees’ themselves, have all cautioned against its use. Not … Continue reading Climate Refugees: Are We Using The Right Terminology?

A Pipe Dream? – Pipelines and Indigenous Sovereignty in Canada

By Joy Kwak Trans Mountain and Coastal GasLink Canada’s Trans Mountain Expansion Project (commonly known as the Trans Mountain Pipeline or TMX) has been at the crux of numerous debates since its conception. This particular project, which was approved by the federal government in 2019, will be an extension of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline aiming to carry crude and refined oil from oil sands … Continue reading A Pipe Dream? – Pipelines and Indigenous Sovereignty in Canada

Coronavirus Outbreak: Discussing the Effectiveness of the Chinese Government's Response

By Enkhuun Byambadorj Fear and panic engulfed China’s usually vibrant and thunderous New Year festivities, as the country was faced with the outbreak of a novel coronavirus originating in Wuhan, China, the capital of Hubei province. December 8th, 2019 witnessed the first death of a patient with unknown etiology among 41 others who had been admitted to Wuhan hospitals with similar conditions. Since then, the … Continue reading Coronavirus Outbreak: Discussing the Effectiveness of the Chinese Government's Response

Language as a Weapon of Imperialism: A Comparative Case Study Between Canada and Korea

By Laurence Campanella and Joy Kwak “Language is not just a social phenomenon but also a materialized tool that is used to legitimize one’s socioeconomic class, political status, racial and ethnic identities, and gender.”  – Jina E. Kim A close examination of countries who have undergone the painful, often destructive process of imperialism shows that there is no single tactic employed by the colonizer – … Continue reading Language as a Weapon of Imperialism: A Comparative Case Study Between Canada and Korea

The Indian Supreme Court’s Verdict on Religiously Disputed Land and Its Implications

By Mehak Balwani India’s Supreme Court ruled in favor of Hindus on November 9th, 2019 in a decades-old dispute over a holy site contested by Muslims. This holy site is in Ayodhya, a city in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, and is the birthplace of one of the most revered Hindu gods, Lord Ram. At the centre of this dispute is a 16th-century mosque … Continue reading The Indian Supreme Court’s Verdict on Religiously Disputed Land and Its Implications

Comparative Case Study: Abortion Access in Morocco vs. Missouri

By Maeve Williams When examining the restricted access to reproductive rights in Rabat, Morocco and St. Louis, Missouri, there is a common link: colonialism.  In the era of first world feminism, it seems that double standards feed deeper divisions more often than they cause compassion. The severity of a female’s struggle is too often compared to another female’s, rather than her male counterpart. For example, … Continue reading Comparative Case Study: Abortion Access in Morocco vs. Missouri