The McGill Food Coalition Kick-Off Event – Community and Food Go Hand-in-Hand

By Enkhuun Byambadorj Food and community were the dominant themes at the McGill Food Coalition’s (MFC) kick-off event on November 15th. Attendees were welcomed with warm coffee, MFC pins, and an honest discussion about the state of McGill University’s food system.  The event featured a panel discussion, including four prominent members of McGill’s and Montreal’s food communities: Graham Calder – founder of P3 Permaculture, a … Continue reading The McGill Food Coalition Kick-Off Event – Community and Food Go Hand-in-Hand

What Anti-Gay Sentiment Means for the LGBTQ+ Community in Uganda

By Mehak Balwani Uganda is one of at least seventy-two countries where homosexuality is criminalized. On October 10th, lawmakers stated that they would be reintroducing a bill to carry out tougher punishments against homosexual acts, recalling the 2013 “Kill The Gays” bill that proposed the death penalty for certain cases. Uganda is moving backwards on the issue of gay rights, though not to a time … Continue reading What Anti-Gay Sentiment Means for the LGBTQ+ Community in Uganda

Comparative Case Study: Abortion Access in Morocco vs. Missouri

By Maeve Williams When examining the restricted access to reproductive rights in Rabat, Morocco and St. Louis, Missouri, there is a common link: colonialism.  In the era of first world feminism, it seems that double standards feed deeper divisions more often than they cause compassion. The severity of a female’s struggle is too often compared to another female’s, rather than her male counterpart. For example, … Continue reading Comparative Case Study: Abortion Access in Morocco vs. Missouri

The Unity of Lebanon’s October Revolution: Art, Protest, and Social Media

By Adriana Franco International media has been flooded with images of protests in Lebanon that are millions strong, from Lebanon’s southernmost cities of Nabatieyeh and Tyre, to the northernmost city of Tripoli and to the nation’s capital Beirut . This anti-regime movement is largely transnational as well, as solidarity protests have been organized by the Lebanese diaspora across Canada, Europe, and the United States. The … Continue reading The Unity of Lebanon’s October Revolution: Art, Protest, and Social Media

The United States’ Use of Human Rights as a Bargaining Chip in its Trade War with China: Why Here? Why Now?

By Laurence Campanella As the trade war rages on between China and the United States, President Donald Trump’s recent strategy of calling out the human rights abuses of President Xi Jinping’s administration comes as an interesting development. The trade war can be traced back to July 2018, when China decided to stop buying U.S. soybeans in response to the United States’ increased tariffs on Chinese … Continue reading The United States’ Use of Human Rights as a Bargaining Chip in its Trade War with China: Why Here? Why Now?

David Malpass at McGill: An Uncertain Future For the World Bank?

By Ariana Castillon On October 7th, McGill was chosen by the World Bank to host the first major policy signaling-address of its new President, David Malpass. Ahead of his afternoon speech in Pollock Hall, Malpass held a Q&A session with thirty students from across the Arts, Management, and Science faculties. While they were given the opportunity to ask him questions about his plans for the … Continue reading David Malpass at McGill: An Uncertain Future For the World Bank?

Discontent in Hong Kong – Breakdown of the Protests Featuring an Interview with Action Free Hong Kong Montreal

By Bérénice Collignon This global trade hub is currently demonstrating its concern and anger regarding its current social state and political standing. Background For 156 years, Hong Kong has been a part of the British Empire. Its sovereignty was eventually passed to the People’s Republic of China on the 1st of July 1997 with one condition: that the region would still possess its autonomy for … Continue reading Discontent in Hong Kong – Breakdown of the Protests Featuring an Interview with Action Free Hong Kong Montreal

Rage Against the Decree: the Role of Indigenous and Marginalized Ecuadorians in Revoking Decree 883

By Joy Ahrum Kwak On October 20th, Ecuadorian President Lenín Moreno met with local Indigenous leaders to revoke Decree 883 in an effort to terminate the intensifying and sweeping civilian protests against his government. The agreement signed that day aimed to negate the implementation of austerity measures, declaring Ecuador once again a “country of peace”. The measures, which included subsidy cuts, were an important requirement … Continue reading Rage Against the Decree: the Role of Indigenous and Marginalized Ecuadorians in Revoking Decree 883

Mongolia’s Raw Coal Ban Promises Results… But What Kind of Results?

By Enkhuun Byambadorj This is a story of development – the aid-dependent economy, deep public mistrust in the government, rapid urban migration, and a silent plague that blankets the sky in the cold winter months. For the 1.5 million people living in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar, the -40°C winters bring with them air pollution levels comparable to, and sometimes surpassing, much larger cities such as … Continue reading Mongolia’s Raw Coal Ban Promises Results… But What Kind of Results?

Welcome to the 2019-2020 Publication Year!

As Managing Editors for Catalyst this year, we are absolutely overjoyed to introduce our team. We have assembled a group of incredibly talented and passionate individuals whose unique voices and perspectives we are excited to feature on this platform. Their fields of interests cover a wide range of development issues and reflect the diversity of the world we live in. Please join us in welcoming … Continue reading Welcome to the 2019-2020 Publication Year!